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IMMUNIZATIONS

Know the Facts About Immunizations

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Kids share viruses better than most things. You can protect your kids from serious diseases that spread when kids share viruses by getting them immunized.

 Questions About Immunizations Rack Card (PDF)



Make an informed decision. Know the facts!

Q. Do immunizations work?
A.
Since the beginning of the 20th century, immunizations have saved millions of lives. Before that, hundreds of thousands of children were infected and thousands died in the United States each year from diseases that are now prevented by immunizations. In countries where people are not immunized, hundreds of thousands of children die from rotavirus (527,000 in 2004) and from measles (197,000 in 2007) each year. Without immunizations, diseases like polio and measles could once again threaten children in the United States.

Find more information about this topic at:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/why.htm


Q. Are too many immunizations overwhelming to an infant’s immune system?
A.
A healthy infant's immune system is strong. Every day a baby is exposed to many viruses and bacteria, and the immune system has millions of cells to fight infections caused by them. It is estimated that an infant's immune system can theoretically handle thousands of immunizations per day. An infant's immune system can safely handle all the recommended childhood immunizations.

Find more information about this topic at:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/Vaccines/multiplevaccines.html


Q. What about autism?
A.
Doctors and scientists have carefully and thoroughly reviewed the evidence and have found NO link between immunizations and autism. In three separate rulings on February 12, 2009, each of the special legal, medical, and scientific groups evaluated the evidence and found that immunizations are NOT associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorders.

Find more information about this topic at:

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/


Q. What about mercury (Thimerosal)?
A.
Mercury is a naturally occurring element and is found in air, water, our bodies and even in breast milk. Today's immunizations do not contain thimerosal (a mercury containing preservative). The exception is the influenza immunization which contains trace amounts, even less than what is naturally found in breast milk.  The small amounts of mercury found in breast milk and influenza immunizations are not enough to outweigh the benefits your baby receives from breast milk and influenza immunizations.

Find more information about this topic at:
http://www.who.int/phe/news/Mercury-flyer.pdf

Q:  Don’t children get protection from their mom against diseases?
A:
  During the last few weeks of pregnancy a baby receives temporary protection from the diseases that their mother is already immune to. This protection only lasts a few weeks or months after birth and leaves the child vulnerable to diseases once it wears off. The recommended schedule for immunizations is determined by when this temporary protection wears off and by the age of the child. 

Find more information about this topic at:
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/immunity-types.htm

 

 

LEARN MORE:

Washington State Department of Health

Immunization Action Coalition

Within Reach WA

Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)

Vaccines: Wading Through the Confusion VIDEO

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August 21, 2017